Saturday, June 14, 2008

Anticipation of the Touch



Hello, Beautiful. Shiloh wants to touch you, too.



Uh, no thanks, one scratcher is enough.



But you have to let me touch you. Sorry.



Even if I have to walk around to the other side.



Hum de dum, let's dance.

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Just look at the hand.

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Here we go, getting closer, just a little closer--stretch, stretch...

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Hmmmm...not so bad--guess you can never really have enough feeders and scratchers.

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A little higher please. Yeah, right there.

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Other side.

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Where's my Reward?

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There you go, good feeder. Just put it in the bucket like a good girl.

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But mama scratches the best.

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"It's not the touch, it's the anticipation of the touch that they most fear."

4 comments:

  1. Lovely photos. I believe she's young enough that her feet will be ok.

    I have a feeling these wild horses are born later in the year. My colt looks like he's not quiet 2. I don't know if this is because they are born later in the year or the lack of good grub. But anyway her body is still growing so thing's should get better. Dr Tim Johnstone in Ritzville is a good horse vet with a good indoor facility for treating horses.

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  2. I'm still very optimistic. We're going to learn a lot after this first trim. My focus is to have it go well.

    I agree, they do seem young for their ages. But if they were capture in August and Beautiful survived--she had to be about 3 months.

    By the look of her, it was like her body burned muscle--she had the look of someone who has been starved and then put the weight back on. So, that tells me she was younger than her group mates and probably not able to compete for food as well. If she was really young, and taken off her mother too soon, it may have been tough for her to transition to food.

    She looks to me like she is growing a lot--mostly up. But since she is young and has been lightweight--there has been less stress on those feet, at least.

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  3. Holy cow, I got busy for a little while and came back and look what you've done all the sudden! Congratulations on all the progress! Wow!

    Don't worry too much about her feet just yet. I wouldn't be surprised if your farrier gets under there and finds it's not near as bad as it looks. And even if it is tight tendons, maybe it's related to nutritional deficiency. Is she eating supplements at all yet? I highly recommend Horse Guard or Equerry's (should have both at Aslin Finch). Problem is you have to feed it with something tastier. Tonka started with Packer Pellets, for some reason he liked the big pellets. Bella first showed interest in... Hmm... I don't remember. It may have been sweet feed, I was feeding that to our heifer at the time. But I know she LOVES Calf Manna now. Or you could try a loose mineral/salt mixture. She might naturally be attracted to that. I know a salt/mineral block will not get enough of the good stuff in them, they just don't lick it enough.

    I can't wait to hear how the hoof work goes.

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  4. Andrea has a good point about nutritional deficiency. I showed my husband the pictures of her feet and he named some kind of nutrient she could be lacking. He's got a degree in Animal Science from WSU and mostly knows about cattle.
    I wonder if the BLM took her off her mother when she was captured. Poor little thing was so young.
    I feel for her. During my ankle replacement surgery I had my achilles tendon lengthened because my ankle had been locked in place for so long. My tendons and ligments are still being stretched out as I move my ankle more. When the cast was removed my tendons were so short I couldn't even put my heel down on the ground.

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Please feel welcome to join our discussion--tell us about your own thoughts and experiences.