Friday, May 1, 2020

Professional Training: Why I Chose It


I'm continuing to train Tumbleweed in preparation for his training, June 1st.  Some friends have asked why I just don't do it myself.


Answer: Invariably, as you pick up the pressure, young horses will throw you curve balls.  I can handle the curve balls on the ground or ponying, but not in the saddle.  I don't have enough experience with lots of different horses to be ready for what may come--and I want him to have a solid start. If it's just me, I can figure it out, given enough time, but I prefer someone who knows how to handle it right then and there.



A 2 year old horse is a SPONGE. Whatever you teach them now will stick forever. Tumbleweed all but begs me to work with him everyday.  He's full of curiosity and energy.

The trainer I'm sending him to is good at find the "holes."  I'm not. I try to find as many as possible, by continually pushing him a little past his comfort zone, but after what happened with Beautiful Girl that day she blew up--I have doubted my own judgement in that regard.  This particular trainer is the best I've ever known at spotting the problems almost immediately and knowing how to address them.

It is also good for him to work with another person and learn how to survive in a human's world. You never know what the future will bring, and I want him to reach his full human/horse potential.

Also, there are big changes in my herd with Tumbleweed and Foxy. It's like some magic alarm went off in all of them with her and him and they don't want them together anymore. Even Foxy is starting to push him away.

He still has the attitude of a baby, so I think it's nature's way of forcing him to grow up.  His time away in training will help him make an emotional break.

There are down sides, too.  It will, temporarily, change my relationship with him. He'll also be quite upset at being thrust into a new location and training program. I will worry about him, but I feel it's the right path.

6 comments:

  1. I think you are wise to send him away. It’s better to have a good start. Going away will be hard for both of you but it will be good. Like a kid going off to college.

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    1. I think so, too. It will be like a mama sending a kid off into the world—scary. I have a tendency to want to over-protect my horses. I did it with Beautiful Girl. I don’t want to make that mistake with Tweed.

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  2. Never apologize for getting a trainer to work with your horse. Acknowledging our own limitations is just good horsemanship. I am going to have to send Drifter out at some point, as I know I won't be able to get enough time in the saddle for him when he needs it, plus I want him to learn all about being a ranch horse, it's what he is bred to do.
    I wouldn't worry too much about him being upset about being in a new place- his intelligence and curiosity will probably be strong enough to give him lots to think about, and horses live so much in the moment, he will enjoy new sights and sounds and things to do.

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    1. Good point. I think you’re right. He is so curious, he will probably love the daily work. I don’t challenge him around here nearly as much as he wants. Thanks for the encouragement. And I agree it’s good to be honest about our limitations.

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  3. I think it's a great idea to send him for training. As much as we'd like to be able to do it all ourselves, sometimes its just not possible with a young horse. I'm sure he'll enjoy his time learning new things. I know you'll miss him and he you but he'll be back before you know it.

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    1. Thank you for the encouragement. It really helps to believe I’m doing the right thing by him. 🙏👍

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