Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Shake, Rattle, & Roll--Tumbleweed on the Long Line

Today seemed like a good day to put Tumbleweed on a long line.  I felt like he understood the principle of going forward, and that his resistance is basic baby naughtiness.

What Tumbleweed thinks: You don't tell me where to put my feet!  I'm the boss!

What all the dogs and cats think: Damn, it's the crazy horse who chases us--run for your lives!

What I think: Yay, my daughter's here for a visit--I'm going to ask her to videotape so I can show all my blogging friends how cute crazy spoiled ornery normal Tumbleweed is for a 10 month old colt.

At his young age, I really don't want to do a lot of long line work with Tweed, but he does need help understanding boundaries.  I'm going to compromise by keeping his sessions short.  I'll put in some time this week (on the line) because he has a lot of spring naughtiness to work off, but after a couple more days I'll give him a break and let him be turned out to play every day with maybe some basic tying, loading, and grooming lessons.

But for now....here we go...

My daughter and her puppy came by and, surprise!, T'weed wanted to stomp on her--the puppy that is.  In the video, you will see him prancing their direction a lot, like he wants to go kick her butt-- then get tugged back into the circle.  He also wanted to run off to the other horses, so when he's on that side, you'll see him being tugged, again, back into the circle.  And finally, the barn door was open, and his Foxy Mama was in there--so on that side he will try to get into the barn.  You'll see kicking, farting, rearing, turning, bucking, running, prancing, and an attempt at rolling.  All the tools in his toolbox.

Video One is rather short, but you'll see a little of that, Video 2, you'll see much more of his antics, and, at the very end, some nice circle work.  Video 3 is his "bad side," which today was his "good side"--going to the right.  And last, a short clip on how easily he walked into the puddle on first try today.  Demonstrating that YES, it does get better!













Have I said how much I love working with T'weed?  He is full of personality and, despite his antics on the line, is quite a loverboy.

12 comments:

  1. It's wonderful that you love working with and redirecting his energy!

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    1. I do. He’s the last baby I’ll ever raise, and I am savoring it all. One day, he will mature, and I will only see small glimpses of this T’weed. ❤️

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  2. What a goober. I'm glad you're having so much fun with him. And this is good practice for all the exercise he'll need during recovery from his gelding procedure. :)

    Too bad you can't get him gelded yet! The flies will be here soon. Are you checking regularly for testicles? Sometimes if they're tense they hide them.

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    1. Yeah, we’ve been checking, and I can’t see any. He doesn’t appreciate being felt up back there, so I try to get regular visuals. All of his other hardware works all too well. You’d think they’d be dropped. I was really hoping to have it done before fly season!!! Arghh!!!

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  3. You're making good progress. It's a lot tougher to get a colt to behave on the line out in the open like that without the natural boundaries of a round pen or fence.
    He sure is full of beans!

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    1. He is full of beans! I’ve never raised such a confident colt—or one that at least puts on such a show of bravado. He truly wants to herd and dominate everyone and everything that comes anywhere near his sphere. But he’s extremely docile to the other horses, of course, except Foxy, who he would love to boss around some more. He and Cowboy do a lot of gelding play together. It’s so sweet to watch them. I’m sure Tweed will dominate Cowboy when he’s released.

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  4. It's good to get this sorted while he's small. Those antics would be dangerous when he's bigger! He is super smart and will figure it all out.

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    1. Oh, I fully agree! I would hate to see a grown horse doing that. Of course half of it would be solved with turnout in the herd, who would teach him some humility. Some will also be solved with the gelding, but the line work will have to do for now. And, as soon as the snow melts, some opportunities for turnout. Right now he’s very confined and has way too much pent up energy. 😱

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  5. :) He is adorable! And...pitching a proper adolescent hissy fit that is entirely to be expected from a spunky punk who does not want to go to school!!! But, if you overlook all his drama and melodramatics, he's actually doing quite well. Just think how much excess energy he's utilizing with those theatrics! Love it! And you're certainly a good spunky punk momma. :) Keep up the good work teacher...

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    1. Your description is about perfect! Sums him up very well! I am trying to tread a fine line between allowing him to think and be opinionated and curious and still be safe and tuned in. I do want him to be a partner when he’s all grown up. So, this will be a dance. Right now we’re doing the herky jerky. 😂

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  6. He really is full of beans! Lots of energy to burn. Working on the line will get easier and he'll learn a lot from it. Have fun!

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    1. You’re right. He did better today. He still had a few opinions, but a small fraction of what is in the videos. It made for a quick and easy session. Yay!

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