Friday, June 16, 2017

She's a Trail Horse


I had another great ride with Leah on Wednesday morning (No photos of those rides. These are from earlier this spring), and then I took her to a clinic, later that day, after work.  At the clinic, we practiced ground tying, ponying other horses, & self-loading into tight, scary places.  Leah did very well on every challenge. 
 
Leah was happy and willing, calm and thoughtful.  The trail miles have helped her quite a bit.  After being placed in truly tight situations--cliffs, water crossings, bushwhacking, down-logs--she seems to have decided it's best to stay calm and not make matters worse.


What do we do now?  At this point, I'll mostly be looking for more water crossings and better balance up and down the hills.  I also need to start training her to neck rein.  It's almost impossible to pony a horse behind when you can't neck rein the horse you're riding. I'll be reviewing YouTube videos first, playing around with different ideas here at home, and then I'm hoping Rebecca will do a clinic or two on it.  

We'll also be starting Beautiful Girl in saddle.  Her initial lessons will be tying for longer periods, trailering, ground driving, and carrying a rider.  Rebecca is getting busier and busier, so I'm not sure how she'll fit me in, but  here's hoping.


12 comments:

  1. You have done great work with her.

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    1. Thanks, Teresa! We've both been pretty dedicated to our girls this year. Makes a big difference, doesn't it?

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  2. Wonderful! Glad you are enjoying your time on & off trail with Leah ~ that's what it's all about!!

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    1. Yes, it is. Now, to get Beautiful there, too.

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  3. Leah's done great, but don't discount your own efforts in helping her be the best that she can be.
    You sure found yourself a good 'Frainer' in Rebecca.

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    1. Yes, Rebecca has been just the helper I needed--she doesn't do it for me, but she gives me that support that comes from working with so many horses and people through the years. An extra set of eyes--wisdom.

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  4. Good progress!
    Neck reining is pretty easy to teach, especially if you can move the horse's front end or hind end over with your legs. The rein becomes a secondary cue. Too many people over steer with the neck rein which ends up tilting the head in the opposite direction that you want them to go- but I don't think you will have that problem.

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    1. Yes, I see people do that all the time. They basically pull the horses head around by yanking back, and over, on the reins. You're right about leg yields, and she does need more work with that. Just this last couple of weeks, she started to show progress there--before, she always overreacted with leg cues. Now, she's actually listening and moving over.

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  5. Yeah! For you and Leah. Great work and training. Good luck with Beautiful I'm sure things will come along just like they've done with Leah.

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    1. I sure hope so. She has been started, but never ridden. She did super well carrying a saddle--let's hope she does as well with a rider.

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  6. Happy and willing, calm and thoughtful -- you can't beat that.

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    1. Nope. It kind of makes you want to retire on your success--but I'm sure we have a few more lessons in our future!

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Please feel welcome to join our discussion--tell us about your own thoughts and experiences.