Sunday, April 24, 2016

The Possibility of a New Family Member


“The greatest problem with Irish Wolfhounds, though, is that they don't live very long: their great hearts give out. A good deal of this is genetic, of course, but I think it is in part that they worry so for us, care so much.”

--Edward Albee

Saturday was a busy day for us. It was the annual Palisades Park Cleanup and Wildflower Hike. As many of you know, I volunteer stewarding the park by maintaining the kiosks and other things. The cleanup is our day to join together and remove all the filthy garbage.






After the cleanup, before the wildflower hike, we have lunch together and laugh about all the crazy things we found. Yesterday, during lunch, I got a text message from a friend. She knew I was thinking about getting another Irish Wolfhound and she had just been contacted by a friend, (who is also a breeder of IWs) who was considering finding a home for one that had been returned to her. My friend told her friend that we would make an amazing home. Her recommendation of us was so glowing, her friend was willing to pursue it.

My husband was sitting next to me, and, excited, I told him about it. He was excited to hear more, too.

But first we had the wildflower hike. The hike is held about every two years and led by Dr. Rebecca Brown, a professor of Botany and Riparian Vegetation at Eastern Washington University. She is passionate about wild flora!! So am I. My only question is, why isn't everyone else??? These hikes are free, but we have the hardest time getting anyone to come to them. I don't get it!!! It's like the mysteries of the universe are opened up to us in those hikes....really private, intimate details of creation.



The Balsamroot was profuse in the park.  You can see Spokane in the background.



The "Fragile Wood Fern"-- It's a poem in itself.





Doesn't this Prairie Smoke look like a human body?









Just looking at these pictures gives me goose bumps.



After the hike, we went home and I was able to learn more about Loki.



He's almost 2 (in May), his owner was a woman who thought she'd be able to take him with her to school, where she works, but instead had to take him to doggy daycare, and realized, eventually, she didn't have the time for him.

Irish Wolfhounds are not for everyone, many people can't handle their needs, but I grew up with one who lived until she was 10 years old--very long for an IW whose average lifespan is 6.5 years.


Mish didn't get anything special, like expensive dog foods and such, but she got a big family who loved her more than anything, and I think that's what kept her alive so long.  Irish Wolfhounds feast on love, and there are tales of them passing away directly after their owners pass away, simply from a broken heart.

Six years ago (with my dad's help--he's pictured above with Mish), we were able to bring Riagan home. My first IW as an adult.





I'm officially an Irish Wolfhound person. (And, a Lab person, as well!)

So, this is how it's going to happen. The breeder is a woman who LOVES her pups. She commits to them for life, even after they go to their new homes. She is willing to keep Loki herself, but IF, after meeting him and spending time with him, we find that we'd like to open our home and commit to him for LIFE, she is willing to let us. This is not a "rescue", but rather a possible adoption.

Our first date is May 6th. From everything I've heard about him so far, I'm optimistic.

18 comments:

  1. Our dog Sedona was Hungarian wolfhound (Kuvasz) mix (German Shepard we think) and I adored her. She lived to be almost 12 which, like you said, is amazing for a large breed dog. She was my favorite dog of all I've ever had -- she lived on love as well; she was smart; and she was loyal. Kersey, our lab, is a great dog too but my heart will always belong to Sedona.

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    1. Oh, I love to hear that, Annette. Have you ever read the novel Sighthound? I love my lab, too, very much. The wolfhound, though, is a deeply feeling and thinking being.

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  2. They are a great breed of dog. It's a shame they don't live as long as they should. I'm sure you will be coming home with a new family member very soon.

    We are getting a new addition to the family by the end of this coming week. My husbands cousin has been a breeder of Aussies for twenty five years and she had a pup from her litter on St. Party's Day that she thinks would be great for us. She was sold but unfortunately my cousin didn't think they would be a good match so now she's mine! I can't wait to meet her.

    And I would never pass up a chance to go on a wildflower hike! Gorgeous plants.

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    1. Once again, our lives parallel! Or, at least I hope so. I can't wait to see and hear about your new baby!

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  3. I am so jealous! I have always wanted an Irish Wolfhound but don't think I can because I have cats.

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    1. My IW loves cats. I am a little worried about Loki though, but I think I can introduce him slowly. Wolfhounds usually have a sense of what is right and wrong and are very gentle for their size. The saying goes, Gentle when stroked, fierce when provoked. Haha. It's true though.

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  4. Your quote at the beginning scared me! I had to scroll all the way through ND make sure you didn't lose your Riagan. How exciting that you may have another family member soon!

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    1. I would have been an AWOL blogger had Riagan died. You'd wonder what happened to me. Thankfully, this is good news. But a big commitment, too.

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  5. Your quote at the beginning scared me! I had to scroll all the way through ND make sure you didn't lose your Riagan. How exciting that you may have another family member soon!

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    1. Thankfully, that was not the case. :) Going to see Loki on Friday.

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  6. What a beautiful area! I am enjoying learning about your dogs - they are just beautiful! How you add another:-)

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    1. Thank you! I have to practice patience,which is not my strong suit, but slow is good in this case, I hope.

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  7. How exciting! Now that I've seen those pictures of the mountains around Spokane, I'll have to plan a trip there one of these years and visit my brother. When is the best month to hike there?

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    1. That's a good question. Spring can be beautiful, but you never know if it's going to rain or get cold. My favorite time is fall, but the wildflowers are beautiful in spring.

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  8. What beautiful photos of the park & it's flowers - when I lived on the Wet (west) coast, my favourite plants were the ferns & the ginormous cedars.

    I think Riagan will soon have a little brother named Loki....
    :-)

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    1. Ah, the ferns and cedars are over on the other side of the state. We have a lot of Ponderosa Pine and Aspen, ferns are rare. I'm going to see Loki Friday. Wish us luck.

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  9. Oh, how exciting! I hope you do get the beautiful Loki. What would life be like without dogs, and horses? :) Your wildflower hike looked amazing!! I would love to do something like that, but my hubby not so much. Sounds like you're doing well, keeping busy and enjoying your life. I'm happy for you!

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    1. Spring is a busy time. Seems like everyone plans the events in spring, so there are multiple choices, but not enough hours.

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Please feel welcome to join our discussion--tell us about your own thoughts and experiences.