Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Old Pictures of Leah




Billy Vens, a trainer, used to come to my house to help me through the first rides.


 
My husband even rode her!





Her grandpa, Quincy Sun Dun.
 Quincy Sun Dun.

6 comments:

  1. Quincy sounds like a great new name for her.

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    1. Thanks for the vote of approval! Her other name sounded like she was going to buck me off and run away. Now I just have to let time do the trick and get used to thinking of her as Quincy.

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  2. I'm just now getting caught up on your blogs. I like the name Quincy much better than Cya :)

    I'm having to rebuild new skills/habits with Skeeter as well.

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    1. I just went over to you blog. I love the sound of your trainer! Excited to see how everything goes. I'm sure it will be a good experience for both you and Skeeter.

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  3. She sounds a lot like my horse, I think he has PTSD and he's always been inclined to have full-blown panic attacks, to a point where it would be dangerous to be on him. I did a lot of ground work and finally got to riding him, and the first couple of trail rides I took him on were kind of scary. He didn't know how to carry a person up and down hills. When he was scared he lost his steering and it was hard to steer him in and out of the trees. I haven't done the kind of work I should have with him, I worked on trust and communication and both of us feeling secure. Last week we went out to a local trail complex and managed to go on a two hour trail ride. He was far from perfect, but I loved it. I hadn't been on those trails since my last horse died seven years ago. I tried a couple of trainers too and they made him worse. I think some horses just need more time to mature and can't be pushed too hard. I think you're on the right track.

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    1. That's wonderful he's doing well enough to handle a two hour trail ride. Steering in and out of trees is complex and requires their full attention. Good training for him. When I was at the trail clinic last week there was a mare who threw herself over being tied and then threw herself over again being led in saddle. So, that's a 10 on the danger scale. Still, his owner was determined to move forward. I'm not sure what happened with it because I didn't see her again. Panic attacks are not fun to work through. Luckily, I've never seen Quincy panic to the point of being dangerous, but my trainer did. One thing the trainer I'm working with now is doing is having me push Quincy a little beyond her frustration level--just a little--and helping her work through it. It seems she's preparing her/me for those times you can't predict where your horse has had enough and all circuits are off.

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Please feel welcome to join our discussion--tell us about your own thoughts and experiences.